Josselyn, John: New-Englands rarities discovered: In birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and plants of that country. Together with the physical and chyrurgical remedies wherewith the natives constantly use to cure their distempers, wounds, and sores. Also a perfect description of an Indian Sqva, in all her bravery; with a poem not improperly conferr’d upon her. Lastly a chronological table of the most remarkable passages in that country amongst the English. Illustrated with cuts. By John Josselyn, Gent. Josselyn, John: New-Englands rarities discovered: In birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and plants of that country. Together with the physical and chyrurgical remedies wherewith the natives constantly use to cure their distempers, wounds, and sores. Also a perfect description of an Indian Sqva, in all her bravery; with a poem not improperly conferr’d upon her. Lastly a chronological table of the most remarkable passages in that country amongst the English. Illustrated with cuts. By John Josselyn, Gent. Josselyn, John: New-Englands rarities discovered: In birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and plants of that country. Together with the physical and chyrurgical remedies wherewith the natives constantly use to cure their distempers, wounds, and sores. Also a perfect description of an Indian Sqva, in all her bravery; with a poem not improperly conferr’d upon her. Lastly a chronological table of the most remarkable passages in that country amongst the English. Illustrated with cuts. By John Josselyn, Gent.
Josselyn, John
New-Englands rarities discovered: In birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, and plants of that country. Together with the physical and chyrurgical remedies wherewith the natives constantly use to cure their distempers, wounds, and sores. Also a perfect description of an Indian Sqva, in all her bravery; with a poem not improperly conferr’d upon her. Lastly a chronological table of the most remarkable passages in that country amongst the English. Illustrated with cuts. By John Josselyn, Gent.
(London, G. Widdowes, 1672), Berlin, W. Junk, 1926, pp. [iv], 114, (2, adv.), (1, printer’s device: a dragon), text-illustrations and plate (woodcuts of plants), small 8vo, unopened, printed wrappers. Fine copy of the facsimile edition.
€ 45
This is Josselyn’s first book on his two voyages to America in 1638 and 1663; the second, an elaboration on the first, was called An account of two voyages, London, 1674 ... Both books are justifiably famous for their record of New England life and customs in the 17th century, and particularly interesting to people who are fond of Maine, because of Josselyn’s keen observation of the country-side around Black Point and Scarborough, where he visited his brother Henry. His comments on every phase of the natural history around him, as well as the medical uses made of the plants, are cheerful and accurate, and showed wide learning for his day. Dr. Paul Sears, noted conservationist of Yale University, who wrote his thesis on the Dandelion, says that Josselyn’s is the first reference to that flower in America. ... (Hunt).
* Cf. Hunt 322; Johnston 247.