Clusiaceae - Hypericum x moserianum. From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors). Hypericaceae
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Plant family in the order Malpighiales. Molecular data supports its monophyly. Some systematists treat it as a subfamily of the Clusiaceae.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum calycinum
From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
London, R. Taylor, J. Sowerby, etc., 1809, volume 29, plate 2017. Hand-coloured engraving by James Sowerby (sheet 145 x 237 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
One of the most celebrated of all British floras is Sowerby’s English botany. This periodical publication, issued in 267 numbers, and published in thirty-six volumes between 1790 and 1814, contains 2,592 beautifully coloured illustrations of plants most of which are drawn and engraved by James Sowerby. The plates are accompanied by descriptive letterpress written by the eminent botanist James Edward Smith, … (Henrey II p. 141). James Sowerby, who was the first of several members of this family who became noted as authors and illustrators of books on natural history, lived from 1757-1822. He studied painting at the Royal Academy, and soon turned to botanical illustration. His first work was for William Curtis’s Flora londinensis and his Botanical magazine.
* Pritzel 8789; Dunthorne 291; Blunt pp. 190-192; Nissen BBI 2225; Great flower books p. 76; Hunt 717; Henrey 1366; Stafleu & Cowan 12.221.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum calycinum. From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum calycinum
From: Flora. Afbeeldingen en beschrijvingen van boomen, heesters, éénjarige planten, enz., voorkomende in de Nederlandsche tuinen by Heinrich Witte.
Groningen, J.B. Wolters, (1868), plate 75. Chromolithograph by G. Severeyns after Abraham Jacobus Wendel (sheet 224 x 302 mm). Slightly foxed. Text enclosed.
€ 120
Heinrich Witte, a Dutch gardener, was assistant curator and head-curator at the Leiden botanical garden from 1855-1898. The decorative colour-plates depict the most attractive Dutch garden plants, shrubs and trees of its time, finely lithographed by G. Severeyns of Brussels after paintings by Abraham Jacobus Wendel.
* Pritzel 10.366; Nissen BBI 2174; Stafleu & Cowan 18.090; Landwehr 213.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum calycinum. From: Flora. Afbeeldingen en beschrijvingen van boomen, heesters, éénjarige planten, enz., voorkomende in de Nederlandsche tuinen by Heinrich Witte.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum hircinum ? + Hypericum olympicum ? - Hypericum foetidum frutescens majus et minus & Hypericum montis Olympi
From: Hortus elthamensis seu plantarum rariorum quas in horto suo Elthami in Cantio coluit vir ornatissimus et praestantissimus Jacobus Sherard ... by Johann Jacob Dillenius.
London, the author, 1732. Engraving by the author (uncut, unpressed sheet 300 x 485 mm; impression 203 x 325 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 120
James Sherard (1666-1738), botanist and apothecary, had gardens famous for rare plants at Eltham, south of Greenwich. Dillenius made the gardens memorable through excellent illustrations, drawn and engraved by himself. They were sufficiently accurate to be of considerable service to Linnaeus (Hunt).
* Pritzel 2285; Dunthorne 94; Nissen BBI 492; Great flower books p. 55; Hunt 637; Henrey 643; Stafleu & Cowan 1471.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum hircinum + Hypericum olympicum - Hypericum foetidum frutescens majus et minus & Hypericum montis Olympi. From: Hortus elthamensis seu plantarum rariorum quas in horto suo Elthami in Cantio coluit vir ornatissimus et praestantissimus Jacobus Sherard ... by Johann Jacob Dillenius.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum × moserianum ?
From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Gand [Gent], Bureau de la Revue, 1890, volume 16, plate 8. Chromolithograph (sheet 158 x 245 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 40
Belgian monthly, published from 1875-1914, giving general information about horticulture, new introductions and varieties, exhibitions etc. Most colour-plates were drawn and lithographed by P. de Pannemaeker, one of the leading artists of this time when Gent became the horticultural centre of the continent.
* not in Nissen BBI.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum x moserianum. From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Hypericaceae - Hypericum oblongifolium ?
From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
London, 1886, July - December, volume 30, plate 560. Chromolithograph (sheet 217 x 283 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 95
All gardeners owe an infinite debt of gratitude to William Robinson - founder of The Garden (1871-1927) and Flora and Sylva (1903-05), and author of The English Flower Garden (1883, etc.) and other works - who helped to break the tyranny of formal bedding and, like Ruskin, drew attention to the beauties of the wild garden. Among the artists whom he employed was Henry Moon, who struck a new and personal, if not entirely healthy, note in botanical illustration. … (Blunt & Stearn). From 1880 Henry George Moon’s plant portraits dominated the pages of The Garden, a popular horticultural publication. Renowned for his lifelike paintings of orchids, Moon appealed to Robinson because of his ability to sketch flowers in a graceful, naturalistic style. The subtle colourings of his paintings and simple arrangement of flowers were very unlike the more stylised renderings that appeared in competitors’ publications. The beautiful colour-plates were lithographed and printed by the Belgian firm G. Severeyns and its successor J.L. Goffart, notable for their craftmanship.
* Blunt & Stearn pp. 239-240; Nissen BBI 2264.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum hookerianum - Hypericum oblongifolium. From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
Hypericaceae - Hypericum perforatum
From: Flore médicale by Chaumeton, Francois Pierre, Jean Louis Marie Poiret & Jean Baptist Joseph Chamberet.
Paris, C.L.F. Panckoucke, 1834, new edition, volume 5, plate 238. Hand-coloured engraving by Lambert jeune after Turpin (sheet 158 x 259 mm; impression 122 x 190 mm). Lower margin stained. Text enclosed.
€ 30
Most attractive French medical flora. The beautiful plates are by Pierre Jean François Turpin and by E. Panckoucke, pupil of Van Spaendonck and Redouté and wife of the publisher. "Pierre Jean François Turpin (1775-1840) was possibly the greatest botanical genius of all the French botanical painters of his day … In particular, his drawings of botanical details have rarely been surpassed. …” (Blunt & Stearn). This is a new edition in larger format with ample margins.
* Pritzel 1679; Dunthorne 78; Blunt & Stearn p. 180; Great flower books p. 53; Nissen BBI 349; Stafleu & Cowan 1091.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum perforatum: From: Flore médicale by Chaumeton, Francois Pierre, Jean Louis Marie Poiret & Jean Baptist Joseph Chamberet.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum perforatum
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1790, 1. edition, volume 1. Engraving (sheet 160 x 214 mm). Small marginal inkstain. Text enclosed.
€ 30
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1521 + I p. 30.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum perforatum. From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum quadrangulare ?
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 109. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 190
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum quadrangulum - Hypericum quadrangulare. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Hypericaceae - Hypericum tetrapterum - Hypericum quadrangulum
From: Flora londinensis by William Curtis.
London, the author, [1775-] 1777-1798,, plate 231. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 280 x 465; impression 234 x 435 mm; light marginal spot). Text enclosed.
€ 130
Though William Curtis was not one of the great scientists, his name is writ large in English botany. Trained as an apothecary, he turned to gardening and then the description and illustration of plants. In his Flora londinensis he presented an impressive record of wildflowers growing within ten miles of London, including many no longer found there; and in his Botanical Magazine (1786 to date) he offered those exotics which Englishmen were pleased to grow in their gardens. … this splendid, complicated, basic English flora … (Hunt). Most of the plates are unsigned, but the artists involved were James Sowerby, Sydenham Teast Edwards and William Kilburn.
* Pritzel 2004; Dunthorne 87; Blunt p. 185; Nissen BBI 439; Great flower books p. 54; Hunt 650; Henrey 595; Stafleu & Cowan 1286.
Clusiaceae - Hypericum quadrangulum. From: Flora londinensis by William Curtis.