Juncaceae - Juncus squarrosus. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others. Juncaceae
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Slow-growing, rhizomatous, herbaceous plants. They superficially resemble grasses and often grow on infertile soils in a wide range of moisture conditions.
Juncaceae - Juncus aquaticus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1828, volume 5, plate 349. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 245 x 298 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 70
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus aquaticus. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Juncaceae - Juncus articulatus subsp. articulatus - Juncus lampocarpus
From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
London, R. Taylor, J. Sowerby, etc., 1810, volume 30, plate 2143. Hand-coloured engraving by James Sowerby (sheet 145 x 237 mm; impression 87 x 183 mm). Text enclosed. Slight offset.
€ 35
One of the most celebrated of all British floras is Sowerby’s English botany. This periodical publication, issued in 267 numbers, and published in thirty-six volumes between 1790 and 1814, contains 2,592 beautifully coloured illustrations of plants most of which are drawn and engraved by James Sowerby. The plates are accompanied by descriptive letterpress written by the eminent botanist James Edward Smith, … (Henrey II p. 141). James Sowerby, who was the first of several members of this family who became noted as authors and illustrators of books on natural history, lived from 1757-1822. He studied painting at the Royal Academy, and soon turned to botanical illustration. His first work was for William Curtis’s Flora londinensis and his Botanical magazine.
* Pritzel 8789; Dunthorne 291; Blunt pp. 190-192; Nissen BBI 2225; Great flower books p. 76; Hunt 717; Henrey 1366; Stafleu & Cowan 12.221.
Juncaceae - Juncus articulatus subsp. articulatus - Juncus lampocarpus From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
Juncaceae - Juncus bulbosus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1828, volume 5, plate 353. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 242 x 293 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus bulbosus. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Juncaceae - Juncus effusus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 84. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 140
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus effusus. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Juncaceae - Juncus obtusiflorus
From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
London, R. Taylor, J. Sowerby, etc., 1810, volume 30, plate 2144. Hand-coloured engraving by James Sowerby (sheet 145 x 237 mm; impression 83 x 174 mm). Text enclosed. Slight offset.
€ 35
One of the most celebrated of all British floras is Sowerby’s English botany. This periodical publication, issued in 267 numbers, and published in thirty-six volumes between 1790 and 1814, contains 2,592 beautifully coloured illustrations of plants most of which are drawn and engraved by James Sowerby. The plates are accompanied by descriptive letterpress written by the eminent botanist James Edward Smith, … (Henrey II p. 141). James Sowerby, who was the first of several members of this family who became noted as authors and illustrators of books on natural history, lived from 1757-1822. He studied painting at the Royal Academy, and soon turned to botanical illustration. His first work was for William Curtis’s Flora londinensis and his Botanical magazine.
* Pritzel 8789; Dunthorne 291; Blunt pp. 190-192; Nissen BBI 2225; Great flower books p. 76; Hunt 717; Henrey 1366; Stafleu & Cowan 12.221.
Juncaceae - Juncus obtusiflorus. From: English botany; or, coloured figures of British plants by James Edward Smith.
Juncaceae - Juncus squarrosus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1832, volume 6, plate 453. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 240 x 298 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus squarrosus. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Juncaceae - Juncus subnodulosus - Juncus obtusiflorus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1844, volume 8, plate 584. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 236 x 293 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus subnodulosus - Juncus obtusiflorus From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Juncaceae - Juncus tenageia
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1844, volume 8, plate 632. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 253 x 307 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Juncus tenageia. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Juncaceae - Luzula campestris + Luzula forsteri
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1833, volume 6, plate 512. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 40
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Juncaceae - Luzula campestris + Luzula forsteri. From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Juncaceae - Luzula luzuloides subsp. luzuloides - Luzula albida
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1833, volume 6, plate 511. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed.
€ 40
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Juncaceae - Luzula luzuloides subsp. luzuloides - Luzula albida From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Juncaceae - Luzula pilosa - Juncus pilosus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 123. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 100
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Juncaceae - Luzula pilosa - Juncus pilosus From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.