Plantaginaceae - Veronica syriaca ? From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others. Plantaginaceae
·
·
·
Most diverse, cosmopolitan family, occurring mostly in temperate zones. Consistsing of herbs, shrubs and also a few aquatic plants with roots (such as the genus Callitriche).
Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 307. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed.
€ 60
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1847, volume 3, plate 218. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 160 x 235 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus varieties
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1847, volume 3, plate 287. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 165 x 252 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
  Plantaginaceae - Antirrhinum majus (varieties)  From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Callitriche palustris subsp. palustris - Callitriche verna
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1844, volume 8, plate 603. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 233 x 293 mm). Slightly browned. Text enclosed.
€ 35
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Callitriche palustris subsp. palustris - Callitriche verna From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Chaenorhinum minus - Antirrhinum minus
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 146. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 170
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Chaenorhinum minus - Antirrhinum minus From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Collinsia multicolor
From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Gand [Gent], F. et E. Gyselynck, 1852, volume 2, plate 193. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 244 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
Lemaire (1800-1871), was a French botanist and specialist on Cactaceae. He worked in Belgium as editor of several important botanical publications, such as the Flore des serres and l'Illustration horticole. Le jardin fleuriste was published from 1851 to 1854 in 4 volumes and is beautifully illustrated, sometimes with large folding plates, which have double numbers. It has a definite preference for the exotic plants, suitable only for the hot-house in northern Europe. In the first half of the 19th century colour-printing from stone dominated the scene of botanical illustration and the Belgian lithographers reached the ultimate in craftmanship, in a period that Belgium was one of the main horticultural centres in Europe.
* Pritzel 10.776; Nissen BBI 2338; Great flower books p. 85; Stafleu & Cowan 4376.
Plantaginaceae - Collinsia multicolor From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Collinsia verna - Collinsia bicolor
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Samual Curtis, 1836, volume 63, plate 3488. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 162 x 253 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of ‘figures’ of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Collinsia verna - Collinsia bicolor From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Collinsia verna
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1856, volume 11, plate 1164. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 160 x 240 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 45
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Scrophulariaceae - Collinsia verna. From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Cymbalaria muralis - Antirrhinum cymbalaria
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 86. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 220
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Linaria cymbalaria - Antirrhinum cymbalaria. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Digitalis ferruginea
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
London, 1816, volume 43, plate 1828. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 237 x 330 mm with folds). Text enclosed.
€ 85
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Digitalis ferruginea From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
Plantaginaceae - Digitalis purpurea
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1853, volume 11, plate 868. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 250 x 302 mm with fold). Slightly spotted. Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 85
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: "De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken." The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Digitalis purpurea. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.Nepenthaceae - Nepenthes hybrids (4x) From: Die Gartenwelt by Max Hesdörffer (editor) Berlin, Paul Parey, 1918, volume 22. Chromolithographed plate by Johanna Beckmann (sheet 221 x 287 mm with fold). Text enclosed. € 40  ¶ Nissen BBI 2295n.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola officinalis
From: Darstellung und Beschreibung sämtlicher in der Pharmacopoea Borusica aufgeführten offizinellen Gewächse by Otto Carl Berg & Carl Friedrich Schmidt.
Leipzig, Arthur Felix, [1858-1863], 1. edition, volume 4, plate 28c. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 215 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 90
Berg was professor of pharmaceutical botany at Berlin University. Schmidt both drew and lithographed the plates. He was a prolific artist who illustrated many of the German botanical works of the 19th century. Jackson describes this work, a survey of plants used in the Prussian pharmacopoeia, as A thoroughly good book, probably the very best of its class; both in text and illustrations.
* Pritzel 646; Jackson p. 203*; Nissen BBI 139; Stafleu & Cowan 10.873.
Scrophulariaceae - Gratiola officinalis. From: Darstellung und Beschreibung sämtlicher in der Pharmacopoea Borusica aufgeführten offizinellen Gewächse by Otto Carl Berg & Carl Friedrich Schmidt.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola officinalis
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1844, volume 8, plate 620. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 248 x 300 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 75
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Gratiola officinalis. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola officinalis
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1790, 1. edition, volume 1, plate 47. Engraving (sheet 158 x 210 mm). Text enclosed (partly in photocopy).
€ 30
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1521 & I p. 30.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola officinalis From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola tetragona ?
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
London, 1832, volume 59, plate 3134. Hand-coloured engraving by William Jackson Hooker (sheet 143 x 230 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 45
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Gratiola tetragona ? From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
Plantaginaceae - Hebe speciosa - Veronica speciosa var. rubra
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1847, volume 3, plate 196. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 160 x 235 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Hebe speciosa - Veronica speciosa var. rubra From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Hippuris vulgaris
From: Dictionnaire des sciences naturelles. Planches … Botanique classée d’après la méthode naturelle de M. Antoine-Laurent de Jussieu by Pierre Jean François Turpin.
Paris & Strasbourg, F.G. Levrault, 1816-1829, volume 5, plate 220. Hand-coloured engraving after Turpin (sheet 120 x 213 mm).
€ 35
Pierre Jean François Turpin (1775-1840) was possibly the greatest botanical genius of all the French botanical painters of his day … In particular, his drawings of botanical details have rarely been surpassed. ... (Blunt). With Pierre-Antoine Poiteau he collaborated in some of the most important botanical publications of the early years of the nineteenth century. In the finely illustrated botanical part of the Dictionnaire … the plates by several engravers were issued uncoloured or coloured.
* Pritzel 10.722; Blunt & Stearn p. 180 ff.; Nissen BBI 2239; Stafleu & Cowan 1293 & 15.384.
Plantaginaceae - Hippuris vulgaris From: Dictionnaire des sciences naturelles. Planches … Botanique classée d’après la méthode naturelle de M. Antoine-Laurent de Jussieu by Pierre Jean François Turpin.
Plantaginaceae - Keckiella cordifolia - Penstemon cordifolius
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1850, volume 6, plate 568. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 160 x 240 mm). Slightly browned and colour partly a bit blurred by damp. Text enclosed.
€ 30
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Keckiella cordifolia - Penstemon cordifolius From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Linaria genistifolia subsp. dalmatica - Linaria dalmatica
From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
London, 1893, July - December, volume 44, plate 920. Chromolithograph by Guillaume Severeyns after painting by Champion Jones (sheet 220 x 280 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 110
All gardeners owe an infinite debt of gratitude to William Robinson - founder of The Garden (1871-1927) and Flora and Sylva (1903-05), and author of The English Flower Garden (1883, etc.) and other works - who helped to break the tyranny of formal bedding and, like Ruskin, drew attention to the beauties of the wild garden. … (Blunt & Stearn). The beautiful colour-plates of The Garden, a popular horticultural publication, were lithographed and printed by the Belgian firm G. Severeyns and its successor J.L. Goffart, notable for their craftmanship.
* Blunt & Stearn pp. 239-240; Nissen BBI 2264.
Plantaginaceae - Linaria genistifolia subsp. dalmatica - Linaria dalmatica From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Linaria vulgaris - Antirrhinum linaria
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1794 [-1795], 1. edition, supplement, plate 221. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 174 x 227 mm). Text enclosed (partly in photocopy).
€ 65
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1522 & I p. 30.
Plantaginaceae - Linaria vulgaris - Antirrhinum linaria From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Plantaginaceae - Littorella lacustris ?
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1828, volume 5, plate 340. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 242 x 299 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Littorella lacustris ? From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum atrosanguineum - Rhodochiton volubile
From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
London, 1893, July - December, volume 44, plate 916. Chromolithograph by Guillaume Severeyns after painting by Gertrude Hamilton (sheet 220 x 280 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 100
All gardeners owe an infinite debt of gratitude to William Robinson - founder of The Garden (1871-1927) and Flora and Sylva (1903-05), and author of The English Flower Garden (1883, etc.) and other works - who helped to break the tyranny of formal bedding and, like Ruskin, drew attention to the beauties of the wild garden. … (Blunt & Stearn). The beautiful colour-plates of The Garden, a popular horticultural publication, were lithographed and printed by the Belgian firm G. Severeyns and its successor J.L. Goffart, notable for their craftmanship.
* Blunt & Stearn pp. 239-240; Nissen BBI 2264.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum atrosanguineum - Rhodochiton volubile From: The garden. An illustrated weekly journal of horticulture in all its branches by William Robinson (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum atrosanguineum - Rhodochiton volubile
From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Gand [Gent], Bureau de la Revue, 1890, volume 16, plate 20. Chromolithograph (sheet 158 x 245 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 35
Belgian monthly, published from 1875-1914, giving general information about horticulture, new introductions and varieties, exhibitions etc. Most colour-plates were drawn and lithographed by P. de Pannemaeker, one of the leading artists of this time when Gent became the horticultural centre of the continent.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum atrosanguineum - Rhodochiton volubile From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum scandens
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed
London, 1830, volume 57, plate 3037 + 3038. Hand-coloured engravings by William Jackson Hooker (2 sheets 140 x 227 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 65
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum scandens. From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum scandens. From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum scandens
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1861, volume 14, plate 1469. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 247 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 40
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
  Plantaginaceae - Lophospermum scandens From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Nuttallanthus canadensis - Linaria canadensis
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Samual Curtis, 1836, volume 63, plate 3473. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 162 x 253 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of ‘figures’ of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Nuttallanthus canadensis - Linaria canadensis From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Otacanthus azureus - Otacanthus caeruleus
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1862-1865, volume 15, plate 1526. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 170 x 255 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
  Plantaginaceae - Otacanthus azureus - Otacanthus caeruleus From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon azureus ?
From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Gand [Gent], F. et E. Gyselynck, 1852, volume 2, plate 211. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 244 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
Lemaire (1800-1871), was a French botanist and specialist on Cactaceae. He worked in Belgium as editor of several important botanical publications, such as the Flore des serres and l'Illustration horticole. Le jardin fleuriste was published from 1851 to 1854 in 4 volumes and is beautifully illustrated, sometimes with large folding plates, which have double numbers. It has a definite preference for the exotic plants, suitable only for the hot-house in northern Europe. In the first half of the 19th century colour-printing from stone dominated the scene of botanical illustration and the Belgian lithographers reached the ultimate in craftmanship, in a period that Belgium was one of the main horticultural centres in Europe.
* Pritzel 10.776; Nissen BBI 2338; Great flower books p. 85; Stafleu & Cowan 4376.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon azureus ?  From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Pentstemon cobaea ?
From: Curtis's botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed: in which the most ornamental foreign plants cultivated in the open ground, the green-house, and the stove, are accurately represented and coloured. Conducted by Samuel Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Edward Couchman, 1836, volume 63, plate 3465. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 225 x 293 mm with folds). Slight offset. Text enclosed.
€ 90
"The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants …" (Hunt). "A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information" (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
  Plantaginaceae - Pentstemon cobaea ? From: Curtis's botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed: in which the most ornamental foreign plants cultivated in the open ground, the green-house, and the stove, are accurately represented and coloured. Conducted by Samuel Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cobaea ?
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Samual Curtis, 1836, volume 63, plate 3465. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 253 x 320 mm with folds). Partly slightly browned. Text enclosed.
€ 75
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of ‘figures’ of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cobaea ? From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon crassifolius ?
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1845, volume 1, plate 25. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 155 x 238 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon crassifolius ? From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cyananthus ?
From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Gand [Gent], Local de la Société (Casino), etc., 1849, volume 5, plate 276. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 169 x 257 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
Belgian horticultural journal, published from 1845-1849 by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical Society of Gent, organizer of the famous flower shows in Gent, Gentse Floraliën, since 1809. Started and edited by Charles Morren at the same time as the more successful competitor Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe of the nurseryman Louis van Houtte.
* Nissen BBI 2212; Great flower books p. 84.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cyananthus ? From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cyananthus ?
From: Flore des serreset des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1850, volume 6, plate 583. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 238 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon cyananthus ? From: Flore des serreset des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon gentianoides var. verplanckii
From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Gand [Gent], Local de la Société (Casino), etc., 1848, volume 4, plate 222. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 170 x 257 mm). Slight offset. Text enclosed.
€ 60
Belgian horticultural journal, published from 1845-1849 by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical Society of Gent, organizer of the famous flower shows in Gent, Gentse Floraliën, since 1809. Started and edited by Charles Morren at the same time as the more successful competitor Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe of the nurseryman Louis van Houtte.
* Nissen BBI 2212; Great flower books p. 84.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon gentianoides var. verplanckii From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon gentianoides Le cardinal + Jules Bretagne + Bébé + Sécrétaire Cusin
From: Neerland’s plantentuin. Afbeeldingen en beschrijvingen van sierplanten voor tuin en kamer by Cornelius Antoon Jan Abraham Oudemans (editor) and others.
Groningen, J.B. Wolters, 1867, volume 3, plate 39. Chromolithograph (sheet 173 x 263 x mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
A beautifully illustrated monthly journal about Dutch garden plants and indoor plants. Only 3 volumes were published. With extensive contributions by its editor C.A.J.A. Oudemans and C. Glijm, J.B. Groenewegen, J.H. Krelage and H. Witte. The decorative chromolithographed plates by A.J. Wendel and others lithographed by Emrik & Binger, Marriën & Amand, G. Severeyns, L. Stroobant, etc.
* Jackson p. 479; Nissen BBI 1477; Stafleu & Cowan 7148.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon gentianoides Le cardinal + Jules Bretagne + Bébé + Sécrétaire Cusin From: Neerland’s plantentuin. Afbeeldingen en beschrijvingen van sierplanten voor tuin en kamer by Cornelius Antoon Jan Abraham Oudemans (editor) and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon giganteus ? - Penstemon giganteum var. elegans
From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Gand [Gent], Local de la Société (Casino), etc., 1846, volume 2, plate 63. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 168 x 256 mm). Slight offset. Text enclosed.
€ 45
Belgian horticultural journal, published from 1845-1849 by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical Society of Gent, organizer of the famous flower shows in Gent, Gentse Floraliën, since 1809. Started and edited by Charles Morren at the same time as the more successful competitor Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe of the nurseryman Louis van Houtte.
* Nissen BBI 2212; Great flower books p. 84.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon giganteus ? - Penstemon giganteum var. elegans From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon gordonii ?
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1847, volume 3, plate 269. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 158 x 237 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Scrophulariaceae - Penstemon glaber - Pentstemon gordoni. From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon lanceolatus
From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Gand [Gent], Local de la Société (Casino), etc., 1848, volume 4, plate 173. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 169 x 257 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
Belgian horticultural journal, published from 1845-1849 by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical Society of Gent, organizer of the famous flower shows in Gent, Gentse Floraliën, since 1809. Started and edited by Charles Morren at the same time as the more successful competitor Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe of the nurseryman Louis van Houtte.
* Nissen BBI 2212; Great flower books p. 84.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon lanceolatus From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon miniatus
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1847, volume 3, plate 232. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 159 x 237 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon miniatus From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon murrayanus ?
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Samual Curtis, 1836, volume 63, plate 3472. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 252 x 323 mm with folds). Text enclosed.
€ 95
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of ‘figures’ of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon murrayanus ? From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed. Conducted by Samual Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon ovatus ? var. atro-coeruleum
From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Gand [Gent], Local de la Société (Casino), etc., 1848, volume 4, plate 210. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 170 x 255 mm). Slight offset. Text enclosed.
€ 55
Belgian horticultural journal, published from 1845-1849 by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical Society of Gent, organizer of the famous flower shows in Gent, Gentse Floraliën, since 1809. Started and edited by Charles Morren at the same time as the more successful competitor Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe of the nurseryman Louis van Houtte.
* Nissen BBI 2212; Great flower books p. 84.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon ovatus ? var. atro-coeruleum From: Annales de la Société royale d’Agriculture et de Botanique de Gand, Journal d’horticulture by Charles Morren (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon wrightii ?
From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Gand [Gent], F. et E. Gyselynck, 1852, volume 2, plate 190. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 244 mm, neatly repaired tear). Text enclosed.
€ 45
Lemaire (1800-1871), was a French botanist and specialist on Cactaceae. He worked in Belgium as editor of several important botanical publications, such as the Flore des serres and l'Illustration horticole. Le jardin fleuriste was published from 1851 to 1854 in 4 volumes and is beautifully illustrated, sometimes with large folding plates, which have double numbers. It has a definite preference for the exotic plants, suitable only for the hot-house in northern Europe. In the first half of the 19th century colour-printing from stone dominated the scene of botanical illustration and the Belgian lithographers reached the ultimate in craftmanship, in a period that Belgium was one of the main horticultural centres in Europe.
* Pritzel 10.776; Nissen BBI 2338; Great flower books p. 85; Stafleu & Cowan 4376.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon wrightii ? From: Le jardin fleuriste, journal général des progrès et des intérêts horticoles et botaniques by Charles Lemaire (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon variety
From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & H.J. van Hulle (editors).
Gand [Gent], Bureaux de la Revue, 1884, volume 10, plate 12. Chromolithograph (sheet 167 x 252 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 35
Belgian monthly, published from 1875-1914 giving general information about horticulture, new introductions and varieties, exhibitions etc. Most colour-plates were drawn and lithographed by P. de Pannemaeker, one of the leading artists of this time when Gent became the horticultural centre of the continent.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon variety From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & H.J. van Hulle (editors).
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon varieties
From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Gand [Gent], Bureaux de la Revue, 1878, volume 4, plate 6. Chromolithograph (sheet 167 x 251 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 35
Belgian monthly, published from 1875-1914 giving general information about horticulture, new introductions and varieties, exhibitions etc. Most colour-plates were drawn and lithographed by P. de Pannemaeker, one of the leading artists of this time when Gent became the horticultural centre of the continent.
Plantaginaceae - Penstemon varieties From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Plantaginaceae - Plantago coronopus - Coronopus
From: A curious herbal by Elizabeth Blackwell.
London, 1737-1739,, plate 460. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 257 x 427 mm; impression 197 x 300 mm). Captions of text enclosed.
€ 100
Elizabeth Blackwell undertook the publication of her herbal at the suggestion of Sir Hans Sloane in order to ransom her husband out of debtors’ prison. She took lodgings near the Chelsea Physic Garden where she drew and engraved the plants growing there. Although she succeeded in freeing her husband by the commercial success of her book, he was later beheaded for his part in a political assassination plot. Mrs Blackwell’s volumes were undertaken at a time when colored botanical illustrations were rare; and her representations were rightly commended in their time. Now her draughtmanship appears rather amateurish and uninspired; but her treatments are simple and forthright and occasionally have a homely charm (Hunt). The herbal was re-issued, in an enlarged form with re-engraved plates, by Dr. Trew of Nuremberg from 1757-1773.
* Pritzel 811; Dunthorne 42; Blunt pp. 136-137; Nissen BBI 168; Great flower books p. 50; Hunt 510; Henrey 452; Stafleu & Cowan 545.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago coronopus - Coronopus. From: A curious herbal by Elizabeth Blackwell.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major
From: Flore médicale by Chaumeton, Francois Pierre, Jean Louis Marie Poiret & Jean Baptist Joseph Chamberet.
Paris, C.L.F. Panckoucke, 1834, new edition, volume 5, plate 275. Hand-coloured engraving by Lambert jeune after Turpin (sheet 158 x 259 mm; impression 122 x 190 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
Most attractive French medical flora. The beautiful plates are by Pierre Jean François Turpin and by E. Panckoucke, pupil of Van Spaendonck and Redouté and wife of the publisher. "Pierre Jean François Turpin (1775-1840) was possibly the greatest botanical genius of all the French botanical painters of his day … In particular, his drawings of botanical details have rarely been surpassed. …” (Blunt & Stearn). This is a new edition in larger format with ample margins.
* Pritzel 1679; Dunthorne 78; Blunt & Stearn p. 180; Great flower books p. 53; Nissen BBI 349; Stafleu & Cowan 1091.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major. From: Flore médicale by Chaumeton, Francois Pierre, Jean Louis Marie Poiret & Jean Baptist Joseph Chamberet.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1790, 1. edition, volume 1, plate 14. Engraving (sheet 160 x 213 mm). Partly foxed. Text enclosed.
€ 30
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1521 & I p. 30.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major. From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1822, volume 4, plate 262. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 243 x 300 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 130
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago major. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago maritima
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1822, volume 4, plate 257. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 243 x 303 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 65
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago maritima. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago media
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1822, volume 4, plate 307. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 243 x 295 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 80
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago media. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago 5 species
From: Duidelyke vertoning, eeniger duizend in alle vier waerelds deelen wassende bomen, stammen, kruiden, bloemen, vruchten, en uitwassen, &c. by Johann Wilhelm Weinmann.
Amsterdam, Zacharias Romberg, [1748], plate 821. Colour-printed mezzoprint by Bartholomäus Seuter finished by hand (sheet 248 x 400 mm; impression 213 x 330 mm). Text missing.
€ 150
Weinmann (1683-1741) was a Regensburg apothecary who organised this massive work, which was published from 1737-1745 and contained over a thousand colour-printed mezzoprint plates representing thousands of plants. The mezzotint process used had been invented by Johann Teyler in the Netherlands around 1688. As practised here by Bartholomäus Seuter (1678-1754) and Johann Elias Ridinger (1698-1767), it was really a combination of etching and mezzotint, which made possible delicate lines and a very fine grain. The addition of handtinting brought about unusual and subtle effects. Some of the best work was done in later volumes by Johann Jakob Haid (1704-1767), who also provides portraits of Weinmann and Bieler (Hunt). The plates are after drawings by Georg Dionysus Ehret, his first published botanical illustrations (although unsigned), N. Asamin and others. Probably from the Dutch edition, which is preferably to the German one Phytanthoza iconographia, as the quality of the paper and finishing is much higher.
* Pritzel 10.140; Dunthorne 327; Nissen BBI 2126; Great flower books p. 80; Hunt 494; Landwehr 212; Stafleu & Cowan 17.050.
Plantaginaceae - Plantago (5 species). From: Duidelyke vertoning, eeniger duizend in alle vier waerelds deelen wassende bomen, stammen, kruiden, bloemen, vruchten, en uitwassen, &c. by Johann Wilhelm Weinmann.
Plantaginaceae - Pseudolysimachion longifolium - Veronica longifolia
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 343. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed.
€ 65
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Pseudolysimachion longifolium - Veronica longifolia From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Rehmannia glutinosa
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1856, volume 11, plate 1134. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 165 x 255 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 55
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
  Plantaginaceae - Rehmannia glutinosa From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Rehmannia piasezkii - Rehmannia angulata
From: Flora and sylva. A monthly review for lovers of garden, woodland, tree or flower; new and rare plants, trees, shrubs, and fruits; the garden beautiful, home woods, and home landscape by William Robinson (editor).
London, the editor, 1904, volume 2, no. 18. Chromolithograph after painting by H.G. Moon (sheet 236 x 320 mm). Slightly foxed. Finely illustrated uncut text of half issue enclosed.
€ 80
All gardeners owe an infinite debt of gratitude to William Robinson - founder of The Garden (1871-1927) and Flora and Sylva (1903-05), and author of The English Flower Garden (1883, etc.) and other works - who helped to break the tyranny of formal bedding and, like Ruskin, drew attention to the beauties of the wild garden. Among the artists whom he employed was Henry Moon, who struck a new and personal, if not entirely healthy, note in botanical illustration. … (Blunt & Stearn). Of the well-produced monthly journal Flora and sylva, printed on hand-made paper, only 3 volumes with 66 colour-plates after paintings by Henry George Moon were published.
* Blunt & Stearn pp. 238-240; Nissen BBI 2251.
Plantaginaceae - Rehmannia piasezkii - Rehmannia angulata From: Flora and sylva. A monthly review for lovers of garden, woodland, tree or flower; new and rare plants, trees, shrubs, and fruits; the garden beautiful, home woods, and home landscape by William Robinson (editor).
Plantaginaceae - Uroskinnera spectabilis
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1861, volume 14, plate 1433. Chromolithograph finished by hand (sheet 163 x 246 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
  Plantaginaceae - Uroskinnera spectabilis From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica acinifolia ? + Veronica romana ? + Veronica triphyllos ?
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 350. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica acinifolia ? + Veronica romana ? + Veronica triphyllos ? From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica agrestis ?
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1832, volume 6, plate 477. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 243 x 303 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 70
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica agrestis ? From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica alpina
From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
London, 1830, volume 57, plate 2975. Hand-coloured engraving by William Jackson Hooker (sheet 140 x 227 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 50
The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants … (Hunt). A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica alpina From: Curtis’s botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica anagallis
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 131. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 220
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica americana - Veronica anagallis. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga
From: Flora londinensis by William Curtis.
London, the author, [1775-] 1777-1798. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 455 x 317; impression 338 x 233 mm). Text missing.
€ 130
Though William Curtis was not one of the great scientists, his name is writ large in English botany. Trained as an apothecary, he turned to gardening and then the description and illustration of plants. In his Flora londinensis he presented an impressive record of wildflowers growing within ten miles of London, including many no longer found there; and in his Botanical Magazine (1786 to date) he offered those exotics which Englishmen were pleased to grow in their gardens. … this splendid, complicated, basic English flora … (Hunt). Most of the plates are unsigned, but the artists involved were James Sowerby, Sydenham Teast Edwards and William Kilburn.
* Pritzel 2004; Dunthorne 87; Blunt p. 185; Nissen BBI 439; Great flower books p. 54; Hunt 650; Henrey 595; Stafleu & Cowan 1286.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga From: Flora londinensis by William Curtis.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1790, 1. edition, volume 1. Engraving (sheet 160 x 213 mm). Text enclosed (partly in photocopy).
€ 30
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1521 & I p. 30.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 347. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica beccabunga From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica bellidioides ?
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 346. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica bellidioides ? From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica digitata ?
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 351. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 60
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica digitata ? From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica elegans ? + Veronica glabra ?
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 344. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica elegans ? + Veronica glabra ? From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1828, volume 5, plate 341. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 242 x 295 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 80
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia
From: Flora londinensis: or plates and descriptions of such plants as grow wild in the environs of London … by William Curtis.
London, the author, 1817-1828, 2. edition. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 487 x 285 mm; impression 355 x 207 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 110
"Though William Curtis was not one of the great scientists, his name is writ large in English botany. Trained as an apothecary, he turned to gardening and then the description and illustration of plants. In his Flora londinensis he presented an impressive record of wildflowers growing within ten miles of London, including many no longer found there; and in his Botanical Magazine (1786 to date) he offered those exotics which Englishmen were pleased to grow in their gardens. … this splendid, complicated, basic English flora …" (Hunt). Most of the plates are unsigned, but the artists involved were James Sowerby, Sydenham Teast Edwards and William Kilburn.
* Pritzel 2004; Dunthorne 87; Blunt p. 185; Nissen BBI 439; Great flower books p. 54; Hunt 650; Henrey 595; Stafleu & Cowan 1286.
  Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia From: Flora londinensis: or plates and descriptions of such plants as grow wild in the environs of London … by William Curtis.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 352. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 65
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica hederifolia From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica labiata ?
From: Curtis's botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed: in which the most ornamental foreign plants cultivated in the open ground, the green-house, and the stove, are accurately represented and coloured. Conducted by Samuel Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
London, Edward Couchman, 1836, volume 63, plate 3461. Hand-coloured engraving by Joseph Swan (sheet 135 x 225 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
"The first and most important botanical magazine made up of 'figures' of plants and short descriptions. Provides a storehouse of exotics, paralleling the indigenous plants …" (Hunt). "A delightful work pictorially, never excelled as a periodical, most carefully coloured and a source of lasting interest and information" (Dunthorne). Started by William Curtis in 1787 publication still continues.
* Pritzel 2007; Dunthorne 88; Nissen BBI 2350; Great flower books pp. 83-84; Hunt 689; Henrey 472; Stafleu & Cowan 1290.
  Plantaginaceae - Veronica labiata ? From: Curtis's botanical magazine; or flower garden displayed: in which the most ornamental foreign plants cultivated in the open ground, the green-house, and the stove, are accurately represented and coloured. Conducted by Samuel Curtis. The descriptions by William Jackson Hooker.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica lindleyana ?
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gand [Gent], Louis van Houtte, 1846, volume 2, plate 81. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 165 x 250 mm). Slightly browned. Text enclosed.
€ 50
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica lindleyana ? From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l'Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica officinalis
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 81. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 180
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica officinalis. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica officinalis
From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
London, James Phillips, 1794 [-1795], 1. edition, supplement, plate 219. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 174 x 227 mm). Text enclosed (partly in photocopy).
€ 70
William Woodville is noted for his early advocacy of the theory of vaccination and for these excellent volumes on Medical Botany (Hunt). This work contains systematic and general descriptions of all the plants in the catalogues of the materia medica published by the Royal Colleges of Physicians of London and Edinburgh, and is illustrated with excellent plates drawn and engraved by James Sowerby (Henrey).
* Pritzel 10.398; Dunthorne 334; Nissen BBI 2183; Great flower books p. 81; Hunt 716; Henrey 1522 & I p. 30.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica officinalis From: Medical botany by William Woodville.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica peregrina
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1828, volume 5, plate 376. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 242 x 297 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica peregrina From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica saxatilis ?
From: The botanical cabinet, consisting of coloured delineations of plants from all countries … by Conrad Loddiges.
London, C. Loddiges & Sons, etc., 1823, volume 8, plate 704. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 156 x 207 mm). Slight offset. Text enclosed.
€ 40
A total of 20 volumes of this periodical were published from 1817-1833. The beautiful engravings are by George Cooke from drawings by George Loddiges, William Loddiges and others. They depict plants growing in the Hackney nursery, founded by Conrad Loddiges and bearing his name. The establishment became famous for its many rare plants.
* Pritzel 5559; Dunthorne 187; Nissen BBI 2228; Great flower books p. 85; Stafleu & Cowan 4914; SABLIT 765; Johnston 806.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica saxatilis ? From: The botanical cabinet, consisting of coloured delineations of plants from all countries … by Conrad Loddiges.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica scutellata
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1822, volume 4, plate 286. Hand-coloured engraving (unpressed sheet 242 x 295 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 65
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica scutellata From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica scutellata
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 348. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 65
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica scutellata From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica serpyllifolia
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1832, volume 6, plate 478. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 246 x 305 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 65
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica serpyllifolia From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica syriaca ?
From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Gent, Louis van Houtte, 1857, volume 12, plate 1259. Hand-coloured lithograph (sheet 240 x 160 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 60
The founder, publisher and part-editor of this lavish Belgian periodical was Louis van Houtte, the propietor of the largest nursery of its time on the continent. It appeared monthly for almost 40 years and was published by his own printing office in the middle of the gardens, the Horto van Houtteano. All the plants shown were for sale in his nursery and include many exotics. The work is notable for the craftmanship of the Belgian lithographers Severeyns, Stroobant and De Pannemaker, who had mastered the art of colour-printing from stone.
* Nissen BBI 2254; Great flower books p. 84; Stafleu & Cowan 15.921.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica syriaca ? From: Flore des serres et des jardins de l’Europe by Charles Lemaire and others.
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica teucrium
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1832, volume 6, plate 401. Hand-coloured engraving (uncut, unpressed sheet 242 x 302 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 115
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision (later assisted by Herman Christiaan van Hall, Friedrich Anton Wilhelm Miquel and Johannes Everhardus van der Trappen). When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable large 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica teucrium From: Flora batava by Jan Kops, Herman Christiaan van Hall and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica teucrium + Veronica prostrata
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 349. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica teucrium + Veronica prostrata From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica traversii ?
From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Gent, Bureau de la Revue, 1883, volume 9, plate 9. Chromolithograph (sheet 167 x 258 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 45
Belgian monthly, published from 1875-1914 giving general information about horticulture, new introductions and varieties, exhibitions etc. Most colour-plates were drawn and lithographed by P. de Pannemaeker, one of the leading artists of this time when Gent became the horticultural centre of the continent.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica traversii ? From: Revue de l’horticulture belge et étrangère by Frédéric Burvenich, Oswald de Kerchove de Denterchem, Édouard Pynaert, Émile Rodigas, Émile Rodigas, August van Geert & Hubert J. van Hulle (editors).
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica triphyllos ?
From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Amsterdam, J.C. Sepp, 1807, volume 2, plate 101. Hand-coloured engraving (sheet 225 x 278 mm). Text enclosed.
€ 90
The Flora batava, a monumental work forming a beautifully illustrated survey of all indigenous plants in the Netherlands. It was started in 1800 by Jan Kops, a Dutch agronomist and professor of botany at Utrecht. The first 10 volumes constitute all that was prepared and issued under his supervision. When finished at last in 1934, Willem Jan Lütjeharms was the editor for volume 28, in which he concludes that this work has ended now and that publication took longer than any comparable foreign flora: De Flora Batava heeft langer geleefd dan een der met dit werk vergelijkbare buitenlandsche plaatwerken. The long publication period reflects the change in the technique of its illustrations. Initially copper-engravings were used, followed by lithographs, all coloured by hand, but from volume 25 colour-printing was gradually introduced. Also several artists were involved, but the plates are not signed, nor much information is given about them. Most plates in the first 3 volumes were illustrated by Georg Jacob Johann van Os. He was born in 1782 in The Hague and settled in Paris in 1826, where he worked for the Sèvres porcelain factory and was a painter of flower and fruit pieces, still lifes, etc. These early, finely engraved plates are exquisitely coloured by hand. Each plate is accompanied by a text in Dutch and French. The first publisher, J.C. Sepp en Zoon, was renowned for its scientific colour-plate books. The work was issued in 8vo and 4to. This plate is in the most desirable 4to format.
* Pritzel 4822; Jackson p. 324; Nissen BBI 2247; Great flower books p. 63; Landwehr 60; Stafleu & Cowan 3874; Sam Segal: Flowers and nature pp. 250-251 (Georgius Jacobus Johannes van Os); Johnston 663; A hundred highlights from the koninklijke Bibliotheek 70.
Scrophulariaceae - Veronica triphyllos. From: Flora batava by Jan Kops and others.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica urticifolia
From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.
Paris, the author, 1831, volume 4, plate 345. Unsigned stipple-engraving in colour by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire finished by hand (uncut and unbound sheet 175 x 265). Text enclosed in photocopy.
€ 70
Very rare work, which was published in parts from 1828-1833 in 6 volumes by the French botanist and artist Jaume Saint-Hilaire (1772-1845). It was planned to issue 800 plates but the regular publication was terminated with plate 544. Among those who worked under van Spaëndonck or Redouté, or who based their style on the pure water-colour technique which Redouté learned from his master, may be mentioned Turpin, Poiteau, Bessa, Mme Vincent (b. 1786), Jaume-Saint-Hilaire, Chazal and Prêtre. Most of these artists were the equals of Redouté in technical skill, and given his opportunities might have won the same renown. … Jaume-Saint-Hilaire was no less distinguished as a botanist, and his introduction into France of Polygonum tinctorum, which yields a valuable blue dye, was of considerable importance (Blunt).
* Pritzel 4404; Dunthorne 160; Blunt pp. 180, 182; Nissen BBI 988; Great flower books p. 61; Stafleu & Cowan 3311; Johnston 943.
Plantaginaceae - Veronica urticifolia From: La flore et la pomone françaises, ou histoire et figures en couleur, des fleurs et des fruits de France ou naturalisés sur le sol français by Jean Henri Jaume Saint-Hilaire.